Posted in Compliance, Electronic records, Governance, Information Management, Legal, Office 365, Office 365 Groups, Products and applications, Records management, Retention and disposal, SharePoint Online

SharePoint Online – records management options and settings

This post summarises the primary records management options, settings and ideas that can be applied in SharePoint Online to manage records.

This post should be read as the second part of my previous post on the records management options and settings available in the Office 365 admin and security and compliance portals. Some of these settings will be referred to in this post.

The options and settings described in this post should ideally form part of your SharePoint governance documentation.

SharePoint Governance

We have already seen in the previous post that Office 365 Global Admins (GAs) have access to all parts of the Office 365 ecosystem. But they should rarely solely be responsible for SharePoint Online (SPO).

Some form of governance arrangement is necessary for SPO, especially if you plan to manage records in that application.

Some of the key considerations are as follows.

  • Who is responsible for ‘marketing’ or promoting SharePoint in the organisation, and making sure it is used correctly? The area responsible in IT for change management should probably take the lead on this as SPO is only one part of the O365 ecosystem. Records managers should have a role too, or be consulted.
  • SharePoint Administrator. You should already have a SharePoint Administrator and that person (or persons) is likely to be sitting in your IT department. Records managers will rarely also be SharePoint administrators; the two need to work closely together.
  • Who is responsible for training people to use SharePoint, especially to highlight the recordkeeping aspects of the application?
  • Who are the Site Collection Administrators? See next point.
  • Who are the Site Owners?
  • Who can create Office 365 Groups?

Answers to these questions should all be documented in your governance documentation.

SharePoint Online Admin Portal

SharePoint Online customised administrator

The SPO administrator role, a ‘customised administrator’ set in the Office 365 (O365) portal, should normally have a log on that is separate from that person’s O365 user log on. The SPO administrator account should not be a generic one (and generic accounts should generally be avoided).

The SPO administrator accesses the SPO admin portal from the Office 365 admin portal. They will also have access to the O365 Message Centre and Service Health sections.

SharePoint Online Architecture

Why a design model is good to have

Organisations should have some sort of design model for their SPO architecture. Most records will be kept in document libraries SharePoint team sites under the /teams path but some could also be under the /sites path.

The design model should include naming conventions for sites to avoid site names that have unknown acronyms or complex names. Site names form part of the total 400 characters allowed from https to the document suffix (e.g., .docx) so site names should ideally be no longer than around 16 characters. For example:

https://tenantname.sharepoint.com/teams/sitename

Records managers should be involved in designing this architecture model and could also be part of any approval process for new sites, to ensure the proposed names are suitable.

The names of SPO sites should generally map to business functions. Where the main function is very large (e.g., Financial Management is very large, you may decide to create sites based on the ‘sub-function’. That is, under the broader Financial Management (or simply ‘Finance’) site, you could have a separate site for Finance AP and another for Finance AR). These can be linked to a hub site that could be the ‘parent’ function site.

Don’t mix functions (such as personnel and IT) in the same site if only because this site is likely to become very large.

Try to aim for team site coverage of all business areas as all areas are likely to create or maintain records.

One relatively easy way to do this is to consult with the business area and understand how they use their current Network File Share location. This has the additional benefits of ‘mapping’ their SPO site to their existing NFS structure (generally or very specific) so it is familiar to them, and assisting with the migration of NFS to SPO later on.

Creating new Site Collections

Generally speaking there now are three types of SPO site:

  • A team site not linked to an O365 Group (but can be retrospectively linked)
  • A team site linked to an O365 Group
  • A communication site

Again, generally speaking:

  • SPO team sites (linked or not with O365 Groups) are the functional replacement for network file shares and, accordingly, contain most of the ‘document’ type records.
  • SPO communication sites are used for publishing purposes, including the intranet. They may contain documents in document libraries that, again, replace network file shares previously used for this purpose.

New sites can be created:

  • Directly from the SPO admin portal.
  • Via the ‘Create Site’ dialogue available in each user’s SharePoint portal, when this option is enabled. When this option is enabled, users can create either a Team site (linked with an O365 Group), a Communication site, or a ‘classic’ site (not linked with an O365 Group).
  • When a new Office 365 Group is created. This includes, if enabled, when a new Team in MS Teams is created, a Yammer group is enabled, or the person choose to create a new group from Outlook. If this option is allowed, whoever creates the O365 Group becomes the Site Collection Administrator and the SharePoint admin will be unable to access the site. For this reason, organisations that want to control their SPO environment may wish to limit who can create Office 365 Groups.
  • Via a PowerShell script.

SharePoint Sites

Site Collection Administrators (SCA)

Every SPO site has Site Collection Administrators. To ensure that records managers can access every site to manage records, it may be useful to add them to the membership of a Security Group that is in turn added to every site’s Site Collection Administrators after it is created.

Site Collection Administrators are added and managed in Advanced Permission Settings.

SPO_AdvancedPermissions

When you click on Site Collection Administrators, this dialogue appears:

SPO_SCAs.JPG

As noted above, if the ability to create O365 Groups is not controlled, the person who creates the O365 Group (as noted in the screenshot above) will become the SCA. The SharePoint administrator will be able to see the site in the SPO admin portal but may not be able to change the SCA settings. They may need to ask a Global Admin to do this.

Being a Site Owner only is not sufficient for records managers. Site Owners should be someone in the business area that ‘owns’ and will manage the SPO site on a day to day basis.

Site collection features – document IDs and Document Sets

Site collection features are only accessible to Site Collection Administrators. The list below expands as new features are activated; as can be seen, the ‘Document ID service’ feature has been enabled on this site. (Note, ‘Site features’ are activated from the Site Administration section, see below).

SPO_SiteCollectionAdminOptions.JPG

The Document ID feature is required for recordkeeping purposes as it assigns a unique Document ID to every object (including document sets but not folders) stored in a library.

If they are to be used in the site, the Document Set feature is also enabled in the Site collection features section.

SPO_DocIDDocSetSiteCollectionFeatures.JPG

After the Document ID service is enabled a new option appears in the Site Collection Administration section called ‘Document ID Settings’ (as noted above).

As can be seen in the screenshot below, all Document IDs begin with a unique set of up to 12 characters. Ideally, the Site name should be used as this will immediately give a clue to the site name on the document.

SPO_DocIDSettings.JPG

Document IDs take the form:

  • Prefix (e.g., ‘SITENAME’)
  • Library number. This is a unique and un-modifiable number of the library where the document is stored. It is not based on the library GUID.
  • Next sequential number.

If a document is deleted or moved from the library, the document ID (the sequential number) is not re-used.

Note that Document Sets use the same Document IDs. These cannot be separately modified.

Site collection features – Site Audit logs

The option ‘Site collection audit settings’ will already be visible in the Site Collection Administration section of all new sites, however (a) the options in the audit settings need to be enabled and (b) the ‘Reporting’ Site collection feature must be activated to enable the production of Site Audit Logs as required.

Note, the Site collection audit sections settings notes that ‘If you’d like to keep audit data for longer than this, please specify a document library where we can store audit reports before trimming occurs’. The default storage location is /_catalogs/MaintenanceLogs. However, the various options shown below must be selected for anything to be saved.

SPO_SiteCollectionAuditOptions.JPG

Enabling ‘Reporting’ results in a new section in the Site collection administration sections called ‘Audit log reports’. This section allows the Site Collection Administrators to create one-off audit logs for a range of activity on the site, going back 90 days.

  • Content Activity
    • Content viewing
    • Content modifications
    • Deletion
    • Content type and list modifications
  • Information Management
    • Policy modifications
    • Expiration and Disposition
  • Security and Site Settings
    • Auditing settings
    • Security settings
  • Custom
    • Run a custom report

The 90 day time period is the same as the O365 audit logs accessible from the Security and Compliance ‘Search’ section. If audit logs are required for longer periods, an add on may be required.

Metadata – Site columns or the Managed Metadata Service

The architecture model and/or business requirements may require the use of specific metadata across your environment. Metadata may be set in three ways.

Managed Metadata Service. This option is effective if you need to use the same metadata columns on multiple sites. Experience suggests that this option will be used selectively.

Site columns. These are in addition to the many columns that already exist by default on every site. This option is very effective if the same metadata needs to be used in multiple document libraries or lists on the same site. It is not accessible on any other site. In document libraries or lists, it must be added as an existing site column (i.e., not via the Create new column option).

Library columns. These columns are created in individual libraries or lists and are not accessible on any other library or list.

All new Site and Library columns have the following options:

SPO_NewColumnOptions.JPG

Each new column may be created in an existing or new group. They may also be (a) made mandatory and/or (b) enforce unique values. Note that making a Site Column mandatory and adding it to a document library will make the library read only in File Explorer if it is synced there.

Columns may have default values and may also include JSON formatting codes.

When Site columns are added to a document library, including via a Content Type (see next section), users may be required to fill in the required metadata (especially if it is mandatory).

Site Content Types

Site Content Types are a way to define metadata requirements for different types of documents, using Site columns. The default ‘document’ Content Type on every new SPO site is simply ‘Document’; all new document-based Content Types will be created using that one as a template.

Site Content  Types may also incorporate standard document templates (via the ‘Advanced section). These templates can be auto-populated using the library metadata. In any case, all metadata in a document library is added to any Office document as its metadata ‘payload’.

Once created, Site Content Types must be added to each individual library where they are to be used. To do this, the individual library must have the setting ‘Allow management of content types’ enabled in the ‘Advanced’ section of the document library settings.

SPO_DocLib_ContentTypesYesNo.JPG

When Content Types are enabled in this way, some other drop down features in the ‘+ New’ option on the library disappear, such as the ability to create Word, Excel or PowerPoint documents as can be seen below (the option on the right shows when Content Types are allowed).

Aggregations, containers, ‘files’ – Site Libraries

SharePoint document libraries are the container, aggregation or ‘file’ (if you will) in which records are stored. They are the functional replacement for network file shares. You may end up migrating from those NFS to SharePoint.

Naming conventions for new document libraries are useful to have but the extent to which you require people to follow them (if Site Owners create them) may differ between organisations.

Document libraries ideally should contain only a year of content; including the year in the library name is a good way to maintain year-based content, which in turn makes it easier to manage at the end of the record’s life.

Avoid using the generic ‘Documents’ library that comes with every new library because users will create folders with uncontrolled names and content.

All SPO document libraries and lists have default views of the metadata. These views can be modified as required (via the option on the top right of the menu bar) with a range of additional metadata that is by default hidden from view. Multiple views can be created; pre-defined views may sometimes be easier than expecting users to depend on searches.

Document libraries include all the usual and expected document management functions including check out/in, copy to or move to and versioning.

SPO_DocumentOptionsincCheckOut.JPG

Users with Contribute or Edit permissions can view and restore versions.

SPO_DocLib_VersionHistory.JPG

If there is a requirement to know who modified what part of a document, it is recommended to enable track changes on that document.

Note, with co-authoring now available, the last person to edit the document will create the last version.

Folders and document sets

Folders  should be seen as visual ‘dividers’ within a file, not as ‘hard-coded’ structures as they are in file shares.

Document sets can include additional metadata (including a document ID), making them suitable for use in breaking down a document library. However, for most of the time, folders are a more logical ‘divider’ for users.

Note that both document sets and folders look the same in a synced library.

Both folders and document sets can have unique permissions.

Create and capture records

One of the best reasons for using SharePoint is the ability to create a single source of truth. That is, a single record stored on a library that multiple people can access and work on at the same time.

Having a single source of truth avoids the requirement to (a) create a initial copy on a personal drive or network file share, (b) attach that copy to an email and send it to multiple people who are all likely to save it somewhere and also send back a changed version.

In SPO, users can create a new record directly within a document library (or in the synced library on a drive). Anyone with access to that library can access it; alternatively the document can be shared. Co-authoring means that anyone with edit access can edit the document. Every time it is edited and closed a new version is created.

If it is necessary to refer to the original from another library, the ‘Link’ option can be used.

Access controls and permissions

All SharePoint site contain three default permission groups. Individuals will usually be added to one of these groups only, depending on their access requirements:

  • Site Owner – Full Control across the site but cannot see the Site Collection Administration section (shown above). There will normally be only two to four Site Owners. Site Owners are responsible for managing their sites.
  • Site Member – Update and edit.
  • Site Visitor – Read only.

All content on a SharePoint site inherits the default permissions above however at any point the default permission inheritance can be broken and unique permissions applied. This is a manual process for document libraries (via Advanced Permissions) but automatically applied if a folder or document is shared with someone who is not in a default permission group.

Note, one of the leading support issues in SharePoint is understanding and unravelling complex permissions, especially when applied to individual documents that are placed ‘under’ folders with unique permissions, in libraries with unique permissions.

Retention and disposal

Generally speaking, a SPO site collection will consist of multiple libraries, each (ideally) containing content that is specific to the activity that it relates to. For example, a library for ‘Meetings’ and one for local forms. Consequently, the records stored in document libraries may require different retention.

If O365 Classification labels are used for retention, and depending on how these are configured, these must be applied per library; the individual documents stored in the library – not the entire library as such, are then governed by the retention requirement.

It is also possible to apply a policy to an entire site collection via site policies. This option will only be useful if the entire site can be subject to a single retention requirement – for example, inactive old sites that have a range of content all likely to be covered by the same retention period, or project sites.

Once retention policies are applied to a library, users cannot delete any content in the library so it may be prurient to apply them when the libraries are no longer used instead. Hopefully you will have implemented year-based libraries, which will facilitate this. Alternatively, the retention period trigger can start when the actual policy is applied.

It may be useful for the records manager to review the content of document libraries, and perhaps export the metadata of the library, before the content is disposed of via the O365 Security and Compliance area as any unique metadata is not visible in the Dispositions area.

When records are due to be disposed, an email is automatically send to whoever is in the Records Management role in the O365 Security and Compliance admin portal. The activity of reviewing and approving disposals happens in the O365 Security and Admin portal.

It may be useful to set up an ‘Archives’ SPO site to keep records of all disposal activities, including metadata from document libraries.

Note the library will remain even after the documents are destroyed. An alternative and perhaps better disposal model would be to use the notifications to alert the records manager to the records due for disposal; the records manager may then export and save the metadata in a SharePoint archives site, and then delete the library entirely.

Note that the retention of records in Exchange Online mailboxes and OneDrive may be managed differently by the organisation.

Minimising duplication of content

SharePoint allows organisations to have a single source of truth, to avoid the duplication of using NFS and then uploading to a document management system.

Users can create the record within a SharePoint library, upload it there, use the ‘save as’ option (where you will see all your SPO sites to choose from).

The ability to share with external users (when this is enabled) also helps to reduce duplication and email attachments.

Hybrid records

As noted above, links can be created in any SPO document library to point to resources in a different location. If paper records are managed in a SPO list, the document library can include a link to that SPO list.

Syncing document libraries to File Explorer

Users with an O365 licence and Windows 10 may use the ‘sync’ option available on the ribbon menu of every library. This option syncs the document library to the user’s File Explorer from where they may continue to access and work on the documents.

Note, as discussed in this post, if there is any mandatory metadata in the library, the synced library will become read only.

End users like using the sync option as, although it doesn’t (yet) display any unique metadata on the library, it allows them to work the way they have always worked and they get the added bonus of being able to do it on any device.

eDiscovery

eDiscovery cases are created in the O365 Security and Compliance portal. Essentially, an eDiscovery case uses search and other options to find records. Once found, these records can be placed on Legal Hold, which prevents their disposal.

If a document library has no retention label applied, and all or some of the content is identified as part of the eDiscovery case with a Legal Hold, and a user deletes a record, that record remains in a hidden library but still visible to the eDiscovery case manager. Once the Legal Hold is lifted, the record will resume the 90 day deletion process after which it will no longer be available.

Search

Search in SPO, and across all of Office 365, is very powerful. A single click in the Search box in the user’s SPO portal will result in suggestions before anything is entered.

Searches will return anything the user has access to. The access limits plus the Artificial Intelligence (AI) engine will return different search results for different users.

Users may also take advantage of the Office Graph-powered Delve (E3 licences and above) or the Discovery option in OneDrive to see information that may be of interest to the user. This works on the basis of the various ‘signals’ between users and objects, as depicted in the graphic below.

microsoft-graph_hero-image.png

 

Author:

I am an experienced information management professional based in Melbourne, Australia. I have had close to 40 years of practical working knowledge across the full spectrum of information, records and content management issues, and direct and practical experience with contemporary and emerging business and information and enterprise content management systems. My product knowledge includes SharePoint 2010/2013/Online and OneDrive (SharePoint Administrator), Office 365 (including as a Global Administrator), Yammer, Sway, TRIM Context (R6.2 & 7.1), ECM Documentum, Alfresco Share; and other online systems. www.andrewwarland.com.au

One thought on “SharePoint Online – records management options and settings

  1. Thank you so much!
    Awesome post!

    Atm I’m developing a DocumentManagement for our company. Your post help me so much!

    Best Regards from Munich!

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