Posted in Classification, Governance, Information Management, Microsoft 365, Records management, Retention and disposal

Classifying records in Microsoft 365

There are three main options in Microsoft 365 to apply recordkeeping classification terms to (some) records:

  • Metadata columns added to SharePoint sites, including those added to Content Types and/or added directly to document libraries.
  • Taxonomy terms stored in the central Term Store, including those added as site columns and added to site content types and/or added directly to document libraries. The only difference with the first option is that with the Term Store the classification terms are stored and managed centrally and are therefore available to every SharePoint site.
  • Retention labels that: (a) ‘map’ to classification terms; (b) are linked with a File Plan that includes the classification terms; (c) are either the same as (a) or (b) and are used in with a Document Understanding Model in SharePoint Syntex; or (d) the same as (a) or (b) and used with conjunction with Trainable Classifiers.

The first two options can only be applied to content stored in SharePoint. Retention labels may be applied to emails and OneDrive content. None of the three options can be applied to Teams chats. Also note that there is no connection between the SharePoint Term Store and the File Plan, both of which can be used to store classification terms.

This post:

  • Defines the meaning of classification from a recordkeeping point of view.
  • Describes each of the above options and their limits.
  • Discusses the requirement to classify records and other options in Microsoft 365.

What is classification?

Humans are natural-born classifiers. We see it in the way we store cutlery or linen, or other household items or personal records.

Business records also need some form of classification. But what does that mean? The 2002 version of the records management standard ISO 15489, defines classification as:

‘the systematic identification and arrangement of business activities and/or records into categories according to logically structured conventions, methods and procedural rules represented in a classification system’. (ISO 15489.1 2017 clause 3.5).

The standard also states (4.2.1) that a classification scheme based on business activities, along with a records disposition authority and a security and access classification scheme, were the principal instruments used in records management operations.

The classification of records in business is important to establish their context and help finding them.

Microsoft 365 includes various options to apply classification terms to records.

Metadata columns in SharePoint

The simplest way to classify records stored in SharePoint document libraries is to either create site columns containing the classification terms and add those columns to document libraries, or create them directly in those libraries.

Benefits

Adding site or library columns is relatively simple. As classification terms are usually in the form of a (hierarchical) list, it is simple to add one choice or lookup column for function and another for activities.

A lookup column can bring across a value from another column when an item is selected; for example, if the look up list places ‘Accounting’ (Activity) in the same list row as ‘Financial Management’, selection of ‘Accounting’ will bring across ‘Financial Management’ as a separate (linked) column.

Default values (or even one value) can be set meaning that records added to a library (that only contains records with those classification terms) can be assigned the same classification terms each time without user intervention.

Negatives

SharePoint choice or lookup columns do not allow for hierarchical views or values to be displayed from the list view so the context for the classification terms may not be obvious unless both function and activity are listed.

The Term Store

The Term Store, also known as the Managed Metadata Service (MMS) has existed in SharePoint as a option to create and centrally manage classification and taxonomy terms in SharePoint only for at least a decade.

In 2020, access to the Term Store was re-located from its previous location (https://tenantname-admin.sharepoint.com/_layouts/15/TermStoreManager.aspx) to the SharePoint Online admin portal under the ‘Content Services’ section:

The location of the Term Store in the SharePoint admin center

Organisations can create multiple sets of taxonomies or ‘term groups’ (e.g, ‘BCS’ or ‘People’) within the Term Store. Each Term Group consists of the following:

  • Term Sets. These generally could map to a business function. Each Term Set has a name and description, and four tabs with the following information: (a) General: Owner, Stakeholders, Contact, Unique ID (GUID); (b) Usage settings: Submission policy, Available for tagging, Sort order; (c) Navigation: Use term set for site navigation or faceted navigation – both disabled by default; (d) Advanced: Translation options, custom properties.
  • Terms. These generally could map to an activity. Each Term has a name and three tabs: (a) General: Language, translation, synonyms and description; (b) Usage settings: Available for tagging, Member of (Term Set), Unique ID (GUID); (c) Advanced: Shared custom properties, Local custom properties.

In the example below, the Term Set (function) of ‘Community Relations’ has three Terms (activities).

Once they have been created in the Term Store, term set or terms can be added to a SharePoint site, either as a new site or local library/list column, as shown in the two screenshots below:

First, create a new column and select Managed Metadata

Then scroll down to Term Set Settings and choose the term set to be used.

Once added as a site column, the new column may be added to a Content Type that is added to a library, or directly on the library or list.

A Term Store-based column added to a library via a Content Type.

Benefits

The primary benefit using the central Term Store terms via a Managed Metadata column is that the Term Store is the ‘master’ classification scheme providing consistency in classification terms for all SharePoint sites.

As we will see below, Term Store terms may be used to help with the application of retention labels (which themselves may ‘map’ to classification terms in a function/activity-based retention schedule).

Negatives

Using metadata terms from the Term Store is almost identical with using a choice or lookup column. The only real difference is that the Term Store provides a ‘master’ and consistent list of classification (and other) terms.

Term store classification terms, including in Content Types, may only be used on a minority of SharePoint sites.

Additionally:

  • It is not possible to select a Term Set (e.g., the function level), only a Term within a Term Set.
  • Only the selected classification Term appears in the library metadata, without the parent Term Set or visual hierarchy reference to that Term Set – see screenshot below. Technically only that Term is searchable. It is not possible to view a global listing of all records classified according to function and activity.
  • If multiple choices are allowed, a record may be classified according to more than one Term. This may cause issues with grouping, sorting or filtering the content of a library in views.
How the Term appears in the library column.

As we will see below, there is no connection between the classification Terms in Term Sets and the categorisation options available when creating new retention labels via a File Plan. ‘Business Function’ or ‘Category’ choices in the File Plan do not connect with the Term Store.

Term Store terms and Content Types can only be used to classify content stored in SharePoint.

Retention labels

Retention labels in Microsoft 365 can be used in an indirect way to classify records in SharePoint, email and OneDrive because they can be ‘mapped’ to classification elements.

For example, a label may be based on the following elements:

  • Function: Financial Management
  • Activity: Accounting
  • Description: Accounting records
  • Retention: 7 years

Every retention label contains the following options:

  • Name. The name can provide simple details of the classification, for example: ‘Financial Management Accounting – 7 years’.
  • Description for users. This can be the full wording of the retention class.
  • Description for admins. This can contain details of how to apply or interpret the class, if required.
  • Retention settings (e.g., 7 years after date created/modified or label applied).

Benefits

Where the classification terms map to a retention class, the process of applying a retention label to an individual record, email or OneDrive content could potentially be seen as classifying those records against the classification scheme.

The Data Classification section in the Microsoft 365 Compliance portal provides an overview of the volume of records in SharePoint, OneDrive or Exchange that have a specific retention class:

Negatives

Not every record in every SharePoint document library may be subject to a retention label. Many records (for example in Teams-based SharePoint sites) may be subject to a ‘back end’ retention policy applied to the entire site (which creates a Preservation Hold library).

A retention label applied to a record doesn’t actually add any classification terms to the record.

Retention labels don’t map in any way to Term Store classification terms, except in SharePoint Syntex – see below (but this only applies to SharePoint content).

Retention labels/File Plan combination

The File Plan option (Records Management > File Plan, requires E5 licences) can also be used to add classification terms to a retention label as shown in the screenshot below. Note that there is no link with the Term Store.

Benefits

Records (including emails) that have been assigned a retention label could, in theory, be regarded as having been classified in this way because the label contains (or references) the classification terms.

Negatives

When applied to content in SharePoint, OneDrive or Exchange, retention labels linked with the File Plan do not show the File Plan classification terms. It may be possible to write a script that displays all records with the terms from the File Plan, but it may be easier to do this using the Data Classification option described above.

Retention labels/SharePoint Syntex combination

SharePoint Syntex provides a way to apply retention labels to records, stored in SharePoint, that have been identified through the Document Understanding Model process.

Benefits

As can be seen in the screenshot above, each new DU model allows similar types of records (in the example above, ‘Statements of Work’) to be associated with a new or existing Content Type that can include a Term Store Term – for SharePoint records only – and a retention label. This provides three types of ‘classification’:

  • Grouping by record type (e.g., Statement of Work, Invoice)
  • Linking (of sorts) between the records ‘classified’ in this way and a Term Store term added as a metadata column to the Content Type.
  • Assigning of a retention label. This provides the same form of retention label-based classification described above.

Furthermore, if the Extraction option is also used, data extracted to SharePoint columns can be based on choices listed in the Term Store metadata.

Negatives

SharePoint Syntex only works for records – and only those records that have some form of consistency – stored in SharePoint.

Retention labels/trainable classifiers combination

Trainable classifiers are another way that could be used to identify related records and apply a retention label to those records. Microsoft 365 includes six ‘out of the box’ trainable classifiers that will not be of much value to records managers for the classification of records:

  • Source code
  • Harassment
  • Profanity
  • Threat
  • Resume
  • Offensive language (to be deprecated)

The creation of new trainable classifiers requires an E5 licence; they are created through the Data Classification area of the Microsoft 365 Compliance admin portal. Machine Learning is used to identify related records to create the trainable classifiers.

Once created, a retention label may be auto-applied to content stored in SharePoint or Exchange mailboxes using the classifier.

The option to auto-apply a label based on a trainable classifier.

Benefits

The primary outcome (from a recordkeeping classification point of view) of using trainable classifiers is the application of a retention label to content stored in SharePoint and Exchange mailboxes. It can also be used to apply a sensitivity label to that content.

Negatives

It is unlikely that every record will be classified according to every classification option.

Trainable classifiers only work with SharePoint and Exchange mailboxes.

Classifying records per workload

The options are summarised below for each main workload:

  • SharePoint: Use local site or library columns, Term Store terms or retention labels (mapped to a File Plan as necessary), applied manually or automatically, including via SharePoint Syntex or trainable classifiers.
  • Exchange mailboxes: The only feasible option to classify these records is to manually or auto-apply retention labels that are mapped to a classification, including a trainable classifer.
  • OneDrive: Manually or auto-apply retention labels mapped to a classification.
  • Teams. It is not possible to classify Teams chats with the options available.

Is classification necessary?

The classification model described in ISO 15489 and other standards was based on the idea that records would be stored in a central recordkeeping system where they would be subject to and tagged by the terms contained a classification scheme, often applied at the aggregation level (e.g., a file).

Microsoft 365 is not a recordkeeping system but a collection of multiple applications that may create or capture records, primarily in Exchange mailboxes, SharePoint, OneDrive and MS Teams (and also Yammer).

There is no central option to classify records in the recordkeeping sense. The closest options are:

  • The grouping of records in SharePoint sites (and Teams, each of which has a SharePoint site) and libraries that map to business functions and activities.
  • The use of metadata, either terms set in the central Term Store or created in local sites/libraries, to ‘classify’ individual records (including emails) stored in SharePoint document libraries. Each item in the library might have a default classification, or could be classified differently.
  • The use of retention labels that ‘map’ to function/activity pairs in a records disposal authority/schedule. These may be applied, manually or automatically, to content stored in SharePoint, OneDrive and Exchange mailboxes.

Neither of the above may apply, or be applied consistently, to all SharePoint sites, Exchange mailboxes, OneDrive accounts. And neither can be applied to Teams chats.

A different approach to this problem is required, one that likely will likely involve greater use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) methods to identify and enable the grouping of records, and provide visualisations of the records so-classified.

Image: Werribee Mansion, Victoria, Australia stairwell (Andrew Warland photo)

Author:

I am an experienced information management professional based in Melbourne, Australia. I have had close to 40 years of practical working knowledge across the full spectrum of information, records and content management issues, and direct and practical experience with contemporary and emerging business and information and enterprise content management systems. My product knowledge includes SharePoint 2010/2013/Online and OneDrive (SharePoint Administrator), Office 365 (including as a Global Administrator), Yammer, Sway, TRIM Context (R6.2 & 7.1), ECM Documentum, Alfresco Share; and other online systems. www.andrewwarland.com.au

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s