Posts Tagged ‘Retention’

Sentencing and disposing of records in SharePoint 2010

August 28, 2014

This article applies only to on-premises installations of SharePoint 2010. 

SharePoint’s ‘Records Centre’ was, in theory, a place to send records from various sites for long term storage, sentencing and disposal. The idea was that you could automatically, via Content Type rules, or directly, via the ‘Send to Records Centre’ option, transfer records out of team (and other) sites into the Records Centre. 

While the theory made sense, in practice there were several problems with the model, not the least being that ‘transferred’ records were not actually transferred but copied and effectively re-registered as new records in the Records Centre. They also lost previous versions, and so on. 

We needed to find another way to manage the sentencing and disposal of records. SharePoint 2013 has the (information management) option to apply a sentence on an entire site, which is great if you want to do that, but in most cases the requirement is to sentence parts of a site, including whole libraries or lists. 

As our document-based records are stored in document libraries, and these libraries generally (but not always) have names that make sense (if you can stop people using the generic ‘Shared Documents’ default library), it seemed a good idea to focus on how we could apply retention and disposal policies to document libraries. 

The first problem is visibility of all those libraries, created across multiple site collections. The only way to see all of them was to be the SharePoint Administrator or have Site Collection Administration privileges across all sites. But it was cumbersome to have to open every site to see what was stored in them. 

I put this problem to our SharePoint Administrator and developer (Eric Fang – blog here: http://fangdahai.blogspot.com.au/) . Using PowerShell scripts, Eric developed a method to display all document libraries across all Sharepoint sites in a list. The list updates on a regular basis.

NOTE: You cannot create this type of list ‘out of the box’, it requires PowerShell scripts, and that will need to be maintained over time. This is not a skill that is normally found with most SharePoint Administrators. 

The list displays:

  • The library GUID
  • The library name and URL
  • The site collection and sites, including URLs
  • The number of items stored in each library
  • The date the library was created and who created it
  • The date any item in the library was last modified

The first, immediate, benefit we could see from this method of displaying libraries was the number of libraries that had been created but not used. We could immediately see the ability to reduce the number of libraries, especially if these had not been used for a given period (say, one year).

The next benefit was the ability to group libraries by site collection. As many of our site collections map to business functions, we could start to see the volume of content that was stored for each function, by library – many of which were created to store documents created through various activities.

For example, a common document library is ‘Meetings’. We can now filter the view to see all libraries that contain documents relating to meetings. We can also see types of libraries that have specific retention and disposal requirements.

While the list of all libraries has provided an excellent way to view all our libraries, we are now working on a method to apply retention and disposal actions to these libraries. One way to do this would be to add an extra column in the list for retention and disposal information (class number, class decription, disposal action, expected disposal date, approved by, etc).

Once a disposal action had been applied to the list, we can then review it when the disposal action became due to determine if the library could in fact be destroyed. If it can be destroyed, it would be possible to export the original library metadata columns to a spreadsheet to keep a record of what was destroyed, and when.

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SharePoint 2013 Site Disposal Policies

May 18, 2013

SharePoint 2013 includes the option to set a disposal date on site collections. This article describes how to configure a SharePoint 2013 site collection to include a site disposal policy.

Default settings

A site cannot be deleted (either manually or automatically) unless a Site Policy has been set up (exception – the SharePoint Administrator has permissions to do this).

Without a Site Policy, the default settings under the Site Closure and Deletion option (see below) are as follows:

  • Site Closure – ‘Close this site now’ click box default: greyed out.
  • Site Deletion – ‘This site will be deleted on:’ Default: ‘Never’.
  • Site Policy – Default:  ‘No Site Policy’.

Setting up a Site Policy

New site policies are created under Site SettingsSite Collection AdministrationSite Policies. Once created, the policy is applied under Site SettingsSite AdministrationSite Closure and Deletion. While you can create multiple policies, only one policy can be selected at a time under the Site Closure and Deletion option.

There are no default policies; the first time Site Policies is opened, the Site Policies section provides only one option – ‘Create’. Each policy must have a Name and may have a Description. The name and description can be the class description from a records retention schedule, using ‘after date created’ or ‘after date closed’ as the triggers (see below).

Site Closure and Deletion options

There are three options under Site Closure and Deletion:

  • Do not close or delete site automatically. The default option.
  • Delete sites automatically. This option deletes a site on a pre-defined date after it was created or closed.
  • Close and delete sites automatically. This option first closes the site and then deletes it on pre-defined dates.

In addition there is a check box ‘Site Collection Closure’ that allows the site collection to be made read only when it is closed.

Delete sites automatically

When this option is selected the following appears:

  • Set Deletion Event. The two options provided are ‘Site closed date’ and ‘Site created date’, plus n days, months, or years.
  • (Check box) ‘Send an email notification to site owners this far in advance of deletion:’ (i.e., to warn them of the pending deletion) – n days, months or years. Default setting is 3 months.
  • (Check box) ‘Send follow-up notifications every:’ (i.e., to remind site owners of the pending deletion) – n days, months, or years. Default setting is 14 days.
  • (Check box) ‘Owners can postpone imminent deletion for:’ (i.e., to postpone the proposed deletion) – n days, months or years. Default setting is 1 month.

Close and delete sites automatically

This option is identical to Delete Sites Automatically except that it also includes a date when the site can be closed – after which a deletion event date is set followed by the same three options above.

Site Closure and Deletion

As noted above, a Site Policy must exist before a site can be closed and deleted using these options. The Site Policy must be selected otherwise the default options (see above) apply.

  • If the Site Policy is based on the Delete Sites Automatically option, the option to ‘Close this site now’ becomes available. If the option ‘Site Closed Date’ was selected, the site will not be deleted (at the pre-defined time) until this option is selected. If the option ‘Site Created Date’ was selected there is no requirement to ‘manually’ close the site.
  • If the policy is based on the Close and Delete Sites Automatically option, the option to ‘Close this site now’ becomes available. This allows the site to be closed earlier, otherwise the deletion date will be automatically calculated from the site policy setting and displayed next to the Site Closure and the Site Deletion options.
  • If no policy is selected, the default settings will apply; this means that the site cannot be closed.

Further reading

Overview of site policies in SharePoint 2013 (Microsoft).